Part 3: Biometrics As User Control

The idea of biometrics in XR isn’t a terribly new one. Methods like heart rate and eye tracking are pretty popular in the research community. Academic researchers have been using physiological signals to measure changes in user states for decades and some AR applications have begun integrating biosignals to inform changes to the system. What is a newer idea is using biosignals as a user controlled input method.

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Biometrical Authorization and the Future

 

  Biometrical Authorization, while something that sounds like it would be straight out of a sci-fi film, is basically a security process that relies on certain key biological features in order for an individual to verify themselves. No more complicated login processes; with biometrical authorization, all that is needed is the specific physiological or behavioral characteristic required such as facial recognition, fingerprint identification, or voice recognition. Nor is this concept necessarily a new one; a wide variety of industries use biometrical authorization as a means to bypass traditional username and password verifications or logins. We already see an implementation of biometrical authorization in a wide variety of devices, such as fingerprint login for mobile phone and devices. So, why are we talking about it?

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World Usability Day 2017

“User Experience designers and researchers can impact the course of events by creating technology, products and services that are inclusive at their core.”- WUD2017

    This past Thursday, November 9th, was the Puget Sound World Usability Day 2017 event, which focused on the theme of inclusion through user experience. This theme addressed the power of technology as a medium that brings people together and helps us to embrace our similarities. This powerful theme attracted a wide range of industry members, from Google to Amazon, to two Key Limers. This WUD 2017 was extra special for us because our amazing VP of Client Insights, Steve Foster, gave a presentation on Biometrics in UX Research.

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4 Tips When Reporting Biometric Research to the UX Community

In collaboration with Rick Damaso.

You’ve completed fielding, compiling and analyzing data, and building a report. Now it’s time to present your report to your stakeholders (e.g., folks from the UX community, marketing executives, and product development teams). While this is your opportunity to showcase your awesome work, it can also be challenging task.

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How Biometrics Help Designers Design Better

In collaboration with Mariano Rodriguez.

Designers are usually creating, iterating, and updating their work in a type of vacuum. They rely on best practices, current experiences, their personal opinion, and if they are lucky enough, they have some user feedback to help guide their design. When the issues with a design go further than what one can simply see, it is important to take advantage of tools outside of design. Traditionally Biometrics is only seen as a way to get data on users, it is seen as not creative and as a result, not usually used by designers. Biometrics provides data such as eye tracking, facial muscle activity, skin responses, and heart rate which can all be used and combined by designers to gain insight on their users and find pain points that they can improve through design.

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What to be Mindful of When Fielding Your First Biometric Study

In collaboration with Manuel Ramirez and Shao-Yu

When approaching the fielding day(s), envision how a session with a participant should ideally be and plan your next moves accordingly.

In this paragraph, we listed best practices and tips that will help you fielding the study with confidence and maximize the quality of data you will collect.

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What Questions Need to Be Added to a Screening for Biometrics?

As you prepare to moderate a session, do you ever have concerns of who and what you may find inside the interviewing room? Take the proper steps to not have a surprise waiting for you. The screener you write can ultimately make or break a project. As we begin to incorporate more technology into our research methodologies, we need to be able to adjust our screeners accordingly. Since Biometric studies incorporate heart rate, facial muscle activity, skin responses and can have an eye tracking add-on, there are many different things to consider. What questions need to be added to a screening for biometrics? In this article, we will walk you through some considerations you need to take when writing a screener for a project with Biometrics. [Read More]

What to Consider When Designing a Biometric Study

In collaboration with Hannah Postings.

Biometrics can be a valuable addition to most research protocols, providing support for effects observed in both performance-based and self-reported data. Such metrics are unique because they provide insight into the autonomic biological processes of a user, often reflecting an implicit change to their cognitive state. Although this insight is often valuable, planning for any physiologically-based research protocol should include careful consideration of both the research plan and interpretation of data. The question is: What to consider when designing a biometric study?

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What is Biometrics?

Biometrics is the technical term to describe being able to measure body movements and calculations. It operates under the idea that each individual is unique and can ultimately be measured based on their specific movements and behaviors. But what is biometrics? What are the benefits of using this new method of research?

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Why You Should Use Eye Tracking For Website Optimization

Eye tracking data delivers valuable insights on how your website visitors interact with the page– how long does it take them to discover a specific feature or product on your site, which kind of information they ignore or miss, what your visitors look at and how much time they spend looking at it.

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