3 Steps to Effective Moderating While Conducting Qualitative Research

       How confident are you in moderating conversations and discussions with research participants? In my experience, there is nothing worse than a participant speaking to a researcher for an hour that is monotone and deadpan. It only makes for frustrated and fatigued participants. During a session, the user’s shut down emotionally and become unwilling to share details because they just want the interview to be over. Effective moderating is the art of building rapport instantaneously with a user, resulting in a more holistic and robust data-driven story for your stakeholders.

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Wondering Which to Use? A Comparison of Quantitative vs. Qualitative UX Research Methods

In collaboration with Mina Rohani.       

     User experience research aims to be able to provide information that seeks to provide insight to the user, provide context for usability, and asses potential problems while creating solutions. In short, the aim of user experience research is to gather information. This information can be used to identify facts or patterns, highlight problem areas, and reach conclusions about users and the usability of a product. Research teams then are tasked with deciding which types of research methods, tools, and techniques they are going to utilize to try to obtain their information. Typically, research methods are split into two categories: qualitative and quantitative. In this article, we elaborate on the differences between the two methods, their individual uses, and benefits in user experience research.

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Three Superpowers that Make Up a Great Ethnographic Researcher

Trifecta of UXR super powers needed to excel in Ethnographic Research.  

 

In this day and age, User Experience Researchers (UXRs) are expected to deliver actionable insights that can meet the demands of teams in agile environments. This means less time spent “in the field” collecting data and more “bite-sized takeaways” that can be quickly disseminated among cross-functional teams. These forces are juxtaposed to traditional ethnographic/exploratory research which can be incredibly valuable when done properly. Considering the financial and human capital investment of conducting in-country or observational research, UXRs and stakeholders have been forced to think critically about how they maximize their ROI (return on investment) on research.

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Methods for Running a Successful Diary Study

Diary studies are a proven method for capturing the habits of your users over a longer period of time compared to in-lab studies.  A diary study is a form of qualitative research that allows participants to self-report their activities, feelings, and thoughts over a period of time.   Diary studies have a data collection period as short as 2-3 days to 30 days; there are outliers of course (such as studying the usage of medical products over time).   In the past few years, we’ve seen an uptick in diary studies being used to help understand the end-to-end customer journey (from awareness to advocacy). 

New tools are available that make it easy for participants to record their daily lives and for you as a researcher to monitor and analyze their entries. While diary studies are relatively straightforward to implement, there are important steps that should be taken to ensure that you are getting the most insightful entries from your participants. Here are methods for running a successful diary study.

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