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How Data Storytelling Builds Empathy

March, 13 2019 | Research Methods

        Imagine being tasked to uncover and deliver findings on a niche topic that is new and uncharted among your audience. Let’s say you have been tasked, as a researcher, to explore the behaviors and attitudes of people living with Celiacs Disease for the product development of a new gluten detector. Although your audience is familiar with gluten-free food, they are unaware of the nuances that separate gluten-free ‘fadist’ from people living with an autoimmune disease that requires a gluten-free lifestyle. How will you illustrate the differences between the lifestyles once uncovered? How will you distinguish the lifestyle of a person living with Celiac from other dietary limited lifestyles?

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Prototyping and UX Research

March, 04 2019 | Design, Research Methods, Prototyping

     In collaboration with Ryan Stratton.

     Delightful and effective user experiences don’t usually happen by chance. More often than not, they’re the result of following a methodical design process that includes research, ideation, testing, analysis, and iteration. Prototyping is a critical practice that adds value throughout the process and helps to ensure a good user experience. In this article, we review what prototyping means and why it is so important for the field of UX design and research.

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Company Branding Through the Art of Effective Storytelling

February, 20 2019 | How-To, Research Methods, Emerging Trends

      Effective storytelling is simple, unexpected, credible, concrete, and emotional. Simplicity breaks the story down into a digestible piece. The unexpected and emotional elements leave a mark on the viewer’s brain and heart, making it memorable. If a story isn’t credible and concrete, it lacks merit and loses its value. A great story leaves a memorable impact on potential customers and keeps your brand at the forefront of their minds when looking for the services you offer. It begins with your company’s purpose, then how to solve a customer’s problem.

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Wondering Which to Use? A Comparison of Quantitative vs. Qualitative UX Research Methods

February, 17 2019 | How-To, Research Methods

In collaboration with Mina Rohani.       

     User experience research aims to be able to provide information that seeks to provide insight to the user, provide context for usability, and asses potential problems while creating solutions. In short, the aim of user experience research is to gather information. This information can be used to identify facts or patterns, highlight problem areas, and reach conclusions about users and the usability of a product. Research teams then are tasked with deciding which types of research methods, tools, and techniques they are going to utilize to try to obtain their information. Typically, research methods are split into two categories: qualitative and quantitative. In this article, we elaborate on the differences between the two methods, their individual uses, and benefits in user experience research.

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The Power of User Culture Immersion

       Let’s say you’ve created a new digital tool that allows users to find and review gluten-free restaurants and brands in one place. So far, you’ve identified your target audience; gluten-free individuals. That’s a great start! Now, what do you know about how these gluten free individuals live their lives? What makes them tick? How do they make food purchasing decisions? How would you go about finding that information?

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Do's and Don'ts of Diary Studies

       A diary study is a research method that consists of collecting data about user activities, behaviors, and feelings over a certain time period, ranging from a few days to a month or more. During a diary study, participants will self-report their experiences and activities on a diary (or digital diary such as Dscout, Experience Fellow, Revelation or just Google Form). Participants will self report their interactions, thoughts and feelings in regards to a product or organization. Diary studies are useful to understand long-term behaviors and potentially create Customer Journey Maps through being able to document the customer's interactions with the product or an organization. 

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Contextual Inquiry Part 2: Defusing Objections to Using Contextual Inquiry

Contextual Inquiry is a method adapted from ethnographic research which combines interviews, observational research, and task learning sited within the operational (work) environment. In our previous post, we defined what the method is, when it is best used (exploratory user research) and why (rich detail around context-of-use). 

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Contextual Inquiry Part 1: The Power of Being in the Room Where it Happens

Imagine your design team has a great new idea for a product that you think has the potential to be a real game-changer in the marketplace. For the sake of discussion, let’s say it’s a new app that will let small business owners manage their supply chain, so they know when their products will arrive, when they need to restock, and so on. Now, if your design team already works in the supply chain space, they might already know a lot about the user requirements. But what if all of your previous products are corporate enterprise-level software, and you don’t really have a good idea of how that scales down - which features your typical small business owners need, and which ones they will never touch?

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Home & Renters Insurance Mobile Competitive Index Report: Trends & Industry Innovation

       Here at KLI, we publish a bi-annual Home and Renters Insurance Mobile Competitive Index Report that reviews eight of the largest home and renters insurance companies in the US and their online and mobile app capabilities. Some of the capabilities and features that are assessed are features such as secure login process, ability to get a quote or locate an agent. The goal of our third-party syndicated report is to help provide consumer-driven data that can help insurance companies improve their user experience. It also helps to summarize how the insurance companies differentiate and help provide valuable forms of competitive intelligence for companies to help them stay ahead and on top of the current market.

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Finding the Best Study Location for Your Situation

August, 27 2018 | Research Methods, UX Strategy

     Let me ask you a question. Have you ever asked yourself, "where should I connect with my users to get the feedback I need?" After deciding how to proceed, did you get the answers you were seeking? If not, perhaps where you met the user wasn’t the ideal place.

     At KLI, we help our clients identify the most ideal venue based on a number of factors: the type of questions they have, the type of data/observations they seek, the amount of time they have, and their budget.

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Affinity Diagrams and Clustering

         A few weeks ago we explored the concept of Design Thinking and how that can be carried out in order to better understand a users pain points and learn how to effectively address them. During the design thinking process, there is a brainstorming phase in which all the ideas surrounding user opinions, user needs, and design issues are brought to light. This can be a pretty overwhelming portion of the design phase, and brainstorming is something that can occur even outside of the design context. However, brainstorming can often become cluttered and overwhelming if there are too many ideas being thrown around. So, how do we organize all the great ideas we have so that we can figure out the best ones?

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5 Ways To Minimize Expert User Bias - Webinar Summary

Experts can be very helpful during initial design efforts for a product, sharing their wealth of knowledge and experience with a development team to guide their understanding of user requirements. After all, they understand everything in the domain so well and know a ton of skills, some of which they can perform without breaking a sweat. But what if we told you that expert influence on early design decisions can also introduce biases if not adequately checked?

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