What Does Responsive and Adaptive Design Mean?

Times have changed in the world of UX since I first started in this industry. I designed and developed websites for only desktop views, and there was a standard content container size at that time. As a result, designing was much easier. If I placed a button on the screen it would stay that way on all devices, I didn’t have to worry about it moving. The only time I had to account for multiple scenarios was when it depended on the user’s internet browser. This all changed when Apple released the iPhone. We were all forced to break out of our rigid thinking in regards to designing and developing web pages. Now we had to design pages in a way that could respond, transform and adapt, seamlessly to any device.

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ESPN Revamps Their Web Design - Data Driven or Data Informed?

For all you sports fans I'm sure you've seen and formed an opinion about the new ESPN responsive website. Most of the comments I've seen have been negative. In fact, most site visitors who have expressed their dislike for the redesigned site have done so in a very colorful way:




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Should You Use Adaptive or Responsive Design?

Once upon a time…

In the first century of the 3rd millennium (aka the 21st century) the world was full of websites designed and developed with high-speed internet access in mind. Then one day, mobile feature phones were introduced: Palm, Inc. (remember them?), Kyocera 6035 and the HP iPaq h6315 look. Today they look like something from the dark ages! It wasn't until 2009 that a few companies started noting mobile phone usage rising and started to develop their own mobile initiatives. At that time, data networks had far slower speeds. Designers were faced with a problem: they needed to allow the small screen carrying "on-the-go" user access to their content without frustration.

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